Harold Wellington Jones was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and after attending the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1894 to 1897, he enrolled in Harvard Medical School, receiving an M.D. in 1901. After two years as a resident and house physician at the Boston Children's Hospital, he entered the field of orthopedics in St. Louis, Missouri, and worked with Dr. Nathaniel Allison, who became one of his best friends. In 1904, Dr. Jones was named Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at St. Louis University School of Medicine (renamed the Washington University School of Medicine in 1918). The same year saw his first medical publications, including two articles written in collaboration with Allison.

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dbo:abstract
  • Harold Wellington Jones was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and after attending the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1894 to 1897, he enrolled in Harvard Medical School, receiving an M.D. in 1901. After two years as a resident and house physician at the Boston Children's Hospital, he entered the field of orthopedics in St. Louis, Missouri, and worked with Dr. Nathaniel Allison, who became one of his best friends. In 1904, Dr. Jones was named Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at St. Louis University School of Medicine (renamed the Washington University School of Medicine in 1918). The same year saw his first medical publications, including two articles written in collaboration with Allison. In September 1905, he decided on an army career and entered the Army Medical School in Washington D.C., whose specialized library he would eventually be asked to direct. In June 1906, he graduated with honors and was commissioned in the Army Medical Corps (MC). Early in his career he served two tours of duty in the Philippines with a small unit operating in Samar and Leyte against native insurgents. In 1916 he was in command of an ambulance train with General John J. Pershing in Mexico. During World War I, Jones commanded the Beau Désert Hospital Center (5 miles from Bordeaux), which had more than 12,500 patients at the war's end. Jones later taught as a professor in the Army Medical School. He was subsequently (1927–33) chief of surgery at the station hospital at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, later to become the Brooke Army Medical Center. From 1933 to 1936 he commanded the Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. In 1936, Colonel Jones was appointed head of the Army Medical Library (AML) in Washington, D.C., now the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM). His tenure would include a critical period in its history. With the outbreak of World War II, appropriations for the Library were increased; the demands for its services trebled and quadrupled within the space of a few months in 1940. In July 1942, he arranged for the Cleveland Medical Library Association (CMLA), in Ohio, to store some 75 tons worth of the AML’s rare books and incunabula for safekeeping and restoration. The "Cleveland Branch of the Army Medical Library" took over most of the third floor of the CMLA's Allen Memorial Medical Library, where it remained until the early 1960s. Jones also led an ambitious project there to edit and update the old George M. Gould Medical Dictionary, whose results were published in 1949 as "Blakiston's New Gould Medical Dictionary." In 1943, Jones commissioned a detailed survey of the Army Medical Library led by Keyes D. Metcalf, then director of the Harvard University Libraries, with funding from the Rockefeller Foundation under the auspices of the American Library Association. Completed in 1944, the Survey urgently recommended the construction of a new building, as well as the reorganizing, expansion and updating of the book collections, Library staff and policies, respectively, to reflect current standards in library science. Coordination with the Library of Congress was a separate side-effect of the survey. With the exception of the new building (not approved until 1958), Jones managed to effect many of the survey's recommendations within a year. During the war years, he also formed a temporary consulting group of top physicians and librarians to advise on the operation and future development of the AML, to significant effect. Colonel Jones had reached retirement age in November 1941, but was asked by the Surgeon General to remain on wartime duty as Director of the Army Medical Library. Finally, at the height of all these developments, he was compelled to retire at the end of 1945. In a unique twist, he ended his military career in the same building he had entered as a young lieutenant. Some of his professional correspondence is held at the National Library of Medicine. (en)
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  • 1877-11-05 (xsd:date)
  • 1877-11-5
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  • 1877-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbo:deathDate
  • 1958-04-05 (xsd:date)
  • 1958-4-5
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dbo:deathYear
  • 1958-01-01 (xsd:date)
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  • 27401367 (xsd:integer)
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  • 718239789 (xsd:integer)
dbp:alt
  • Colonel Harold W. Jones, M.D., circa 1944: portrait in the National Library of Medicine
dbp:birthPlace
  • Cambridge, Massachusetts
dbp:caption
  • Colonel Harold W. Jones, M.D.
dbp:deathPlace
  • Orlando, Florida
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  • Director of the Army Medical Library 1936-1944
dbp:nationality
  • U.S.
dct:description
  • American physician (en)
dct:subject
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rdfs:comment
  • Harold Wellington Jones was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and after attending the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1894 to 1897, he enrolled in Harvard Medical School, receiving an M.D. in 1901. After two years as a resident and house physician at the Boston Children's Hospital, he entered the field of orthopedics in St. Louis, Missouri, and worked with Dr. Nathaniel Allison, who became one of his best friends. In 1904, Dr. Jones was named Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at St. Louis University School of Medicine (renamed the Washington University School of Medicine in 1918). The same year saw his first medical publications, including two articles written in collaboration with Allison. (en)
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  • Harold W. Jones (en)
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  • male (en)
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  • Harold W. Jones (en)
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  • Jones (en)
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