Géographe was a 20-gun Serpente class corvette of the French Navy. She was named Uranie in 1797, and renamed Galatée in 1799, still on her building site. Her builder refused to launch her, as he had not been paid to that time. Finally launched in June 1800, she was renamed Géographe on 23 August 1800. In late 1802 the expedition was at Port Jackson, where the government sold 60 casks of flour and 25 casks of salt meat to Baudin to resupply his two vessels. The supplies permitted Naturaliste to return to France and Géographe to continue her explorations of the Australian coast.

Property Value
dbo:MeanOfTransportation/length
  • 40300.0
dbo:abstract
  • Pour les articles homonymes, voir Géographe (homonymie). Le Géographe est une corvette française qui fut l'un des deux principaux navires avec le Naturaliste qui firent partie de l'expédition aux Terres australes que commanda Nicolas Baudin au départ du Havre le 19 octobre 1800. Ce navire est très certainement l'ex-Uranie, une des corvettes du programme révolutionnaire de 1793 mise en chantier chez l'entrepreneur Loquet en 1794 à Honfleur, selon les ordres du Ministre de la marine et des colonies, Monge, d'après les plans du sous-ingénieur Le Tellier. Le navire, encore inachevé, est rebaptisé Galatée en 1799. Son constructeur refuse de le lancer car il n'a pas été payé. Finalement, le lancement se fait en juin 1800, et il est encore rebaptisé Le Géographe le 23 août 1800 jusqu'à sa radiation en 1800. D'une longueur de 124 pieds de rablure en rablure à la flottaison, 30 pieds de largeur au fort, d'un déplacement en tonneaux de 796 tx, elle était armée à son lancement de 24 canons de 12 pouces. (fr)
  • Géographe was a 20-gun Serpente class corvette of the French Navy. She was named Uranie in 1797, and renamed Galatée in 1799, still on her building site. Her builder refused to launch her, as he had not been paid to that time. Finally launched in June 1800, she was renamed Géographe on 23 August 1800. On 19 October 1800, under captain Nicolas Baudin, she departed Le Havre with Naturaliste for an exploration of Australia. She carried a number of scholars, painters, and designers, as well as Anselme Riedlé, the gardener, who had already accompanied Baudin on a previous expedition, and Charles Alexander Lesueur, an artist. The two vessels reached Tenerife on 13 November. They then crossed the equator on 11 December and arrived at Isle de France (Mauritius), on 16 March 1801. For some 18 months Naturaliste and Géographe explored the less-known regions of New Holland (Australia), and Van Diemen's Land. On 30 May Baudin made his first major discovery. Baudin named the bay they found that day on the coast of Western Australia Geographe Bay. Later, the cape at the south of the bay was named Cape Naturaliste. Riedlé died at Timor on 21 October 1801 where he was collecting specimens in the region of Kupang.Lasueur, with François Péron, took over the duties as naturalist after the death of the expedition's zoologist René Maugé. Together Lasueur and Maugé collected over 100,000 zoological specimens. In 1802 Lasueur made the only known sketches of the King Island emu in its natural habitat (the bird became extinct in 1822). In late 1802 the expedition was at Port Jackson, where the government sold 60 casks of flour and 25 casks of salt meat to Baudin to resupply his two vessels. The supplies permitted Naturaliste to return to France and Géographe to continue her explorations of the Australian coast. Géographe returned to Le Havre on 23 March 1804, under Frigate Captain Milius, as Baudin had died during the expedition. After her return her armament was steadily reduced. From 1807 she served as a powder hulk in theCaudran district at Lorient. The next year she became a barracks ship. In October 1811 Géographe replaced Société as the headquarters hulk for Lorient. Géographe was decommissioned in December, but continued in use as a service craft. (en)
dbo:builder
dbo:class
dbo:length
  • 40.300000 (xsd:double)
dbo:shipBeam
  • 9.700000 (xsd:double)
dbo:shipLaunch
  • 1800-06-08 (xsd:date)
dbo:status
  • 6 April 1819
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 20506945 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 711820537 (xsd:integer)
dbp:shipAcquired
  • August 1800
dbp:shipArmament
  • 1800 (xsd:integer)
  • 1804 (xsd:integer)
  • 1806 (xsd:integer)
  • 1811 (xsd:integer)
dbp:shipCaption
  • Géographe and Naturaliste
dbp:shipCountry
  • France
dbp:shipDisplacement
  • 350 (xsd:integer)
dbp:shipFlag
dbp:shipImage
  • 300 (xsd:integer)
dbp:shipInService
  • September 1800
dbp:shipLaidDown
  • September 1794
dbp:shipNamesake
dbp:shipPropulsion
  • Sail
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Pour les articles homonymes, voir Géographe (homonymie). Le Géographe est une corvette française qui fut l'un des deux principaux navires avec le Naturaliste qui firent partie de l'expédition aux Terres australes que commanda Nicolas Baudin au départ du Havre le 19 octobre 1800. D'une longueur de 124 pieds de rablure en rablure à la flottaison, 30 pieds de largeur au fort, d'un déplacement en tonneaux de 796 tx, elle était armée à son lancement de 24 canons de 12 pouces. (fr)
  • Géographe was a 20-gun Serpente class corvette of the French Navy. She was named Uranie in 1797, and renamed Galatée in 1799, still on her building site. Her builder refused to launch her, as he had not been paid to that time. Finally launched in June 1800, she was renamed Géographe on 23 August 1800. In late 1802 the expedition was at Port Jackson, where the government sold 60 casks of flour and 25 casks of salt meat to Baudin to resupply his two vessels. The supplies permitted Naturaliste to return to France and Géographe to continue her explorations of the Australian coast. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Le Géographe (corvette) (fr)
  • French corvette Géographe (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Géographe (en)
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is owl:sameAs of
is foaf:primaryTopic of