The trade center Fort Colvile (also Fort Colville) was built by the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) at Kettle Falls on the Columbia River in 1825 and operated in the Columbia fur district of the company. Named for Andrew Colville, a London governor of the HBC, the fort was a few miles west of the present site of Colville, Washington. It was an important stop on the York Factory Express trade route to London via the Hudson Bay. The HBC for some time considered Fort Colvile second in importance only to Fort Vancouver, near the mouth of the Columbia, until the foundation of Fort Victoria.

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  • The trade center Fort Colvile (also Fort Colville) was built by the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) at Kettle Falls on the Columbia River in 1825 and operated in the Columbia fur district of the company. Named for Andrew Colville, a London governor of the HBC, the fort was a few miles west of the present site of Colville, Washington. It was an important stop on the York Factory Express trade route to London via the Hudson Bay. The HBC for some time considered Fort Colvile second in importance only to Fort Vancouver, near the mouth of the Columbia, until the foundation of Fort Victoria. Under the Treaty of 1818, the Great Britain and the United States of America both claimed rights to the Oregon Country. This contentious dispute for ownership of the land was ended by the Oregon Treaty of 1846. The boundary between British North America and the United States was extended to the Pacific Ocean on the 49th Parallel, with all of Vancouver Island considered British. During the gold rushes of the 1850s and 1860s, Fort Colvile in 1860 especially became an important centre for mining activity and supplies. Abandoned in June 1871, some buildings stood until they burned in 1910. The construction of Grand Coulee Dam resulted in the site being flooded in 1940, as was Kettle Falls. When Lake Roosevelt was drawn down for construction of Grand Coulee Dam's Powerhouse #3 in the late 1960s and early 1970, Fort Colvile and Kettle Falls were revealed. After archaeological work was performed by Washington State University and the University of Idaho, the Fort Colvile site was again inundated by Lake Roosevelt. In 1974, Fort Colvile was added to the National Register of Historic Places for its historic significance. (en)
  • O centro de comércio Fort Colville (também "Colvile") foi construído pela Companhia da Baía de Hudson em Kettle Falls às margens do rio Columbia, a poucas milhas a oeste da atual localização de Colville, Washington em 1825. Recebeu esse nome em homenagem a Andrew Colville, um governador de Londres da Companhia da Baía de Hudson. Como um forte da Baía de Hudson na fronteira, Fort Colville era considerado o segundo em importância perdendo apenas para o Fort Vancouver, próximo da foz do Columbia. Abandonado em 1870, alguns edifícios resistiram até serem incendiados em 1910. A construção da Represa Grand Coulee inundou o local juntamente com Kettle Falls em 1940. O lago Roosevelt foi dragado para a construção da terceira turbina da Represa Grand Coulee no final da década de 1960 e início da 70, revelando as quedas e o local do antigo Fort Colville, onde o trabalho arqueológico foi realizado pela Universidade do Estado de Washington e a Universidade de Idaho. (pt)
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  • Fort Colvile
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  • Indian camp at Fort Colvile by Paul Kane.
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  • Location:
  • Abandoned:
  • Company built:
  • Constructed:
  • Continent:
  • Later Ownership:
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  • Fur Trade Outpost
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  • The trade center Fort Colvile (also Fort Colville) was built by the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) at Kettle Falls on the Columbia River in 1825 and operated in the Columbia fur district of the company. Named for Andrew Colville, a London governor of the HBC, the fort was a few miles west of the present site of Colville, Washington. It was an important stop on the York Factory Express trade route to London via the Hudson Bay. The HBC for some time considered Fort Colvile second in importance only to Fort Vancouver, near the mouth of the Columbia, until the foundation of Fort Victoria. (en)
  • O centro de comércio Fort Colville (também "Colvile") foi construído pela Companhia da Baía de Hudson em Kettle Falls às margens do rio Columbia, a poucas milhas a oeste da atual localização de Colville, Washington em 1825. Recebeu esse nome em homenagem a Andrew Colville, um governador de Londres da Companhia da Baía de Hudson. Como um forte da Baía de Hudson na fronteira, Fort Colville era considerado o segundo em importância perdendo apenas para o Fort Vancouver, próximo da foz do Columbia. Abandonado em 1870, alguns edifícios resistiram até serem incendiados em 1910. A construção da Represa Grand Coulee inundou o local juntamente com Kettle Falls em 1940. O lago Roosevelt foi dragado para a construção da terceira turbina da Represa Grand Coulee no final da década de 1960 e início da 70 (pt)
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  • Fort Colvile (en)
  • Fort Colville (pt)
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