Entella (Greek: Ἔντελλα), was an ancient city in the interior of Sicily, situated on the left bank of the river Hypsas (modern Belice), and nearly midway between the two seas, being about 40 km from the mouth of the Hypsas, and much about the same distance from the north coast of the island, at the Gulf of Castellamare. There are extant coins of Entella, with the legend ΕΝΤΕΛΛΙΝΩΝ at full; while others struck under the Campanian occupation of the city have ΕΝΤΕΛΛΑΣ, and on the reverse ΚΑΜΠΑΝΩΝ.

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  • Entella (Greek: Ἔντελλα), was an ancient city in the interior of Sicily, situated on the left bank of the river Hypsas (modern Belice), and nearly midway between the two seas, being about 40 km from the mouth of the Hypsas, and much about the same distance from the north coast of the island, at the Gulf of Castellamare. It was a very ancient city, and apparently of Sicanian origin, though the traditions concerning its foundation connected it with the Elymi and the supposed Trojan colony. According to some writers it was founded by Acestes, and named after his wife Entella, a tradition to which Silius Italicus alludes, while others ascribed its foundation to Elymus, and Virgil represents Entellus (evidently the eponymous hero of the city) as a friend and comrade of Acestes. Thucydides, however, reckons Eryx and Egesta the only two cities of the Elymi, and does not notice Entella at all, any more than the other places of native Sicanian or Siculian origin. The first historical mention of Entella is found in Diodorus, who tells us that in 404 BCE the Campanian mercenaries, who had been in the service of the Carthaginians during the war, having been admitted into the city on friendly terms, turned their arms against the inhabitants, put all the male citizens to the sword, and made themselves masters of the place, of which they retained possession for many years. During the subsequent wars of Dionysius with the Carthaginians, the Campanian occupants of Entella sided with their former masters, and even continued faithful to their alliance in 396 BCE, when all the cities of Sicily except five went over to that of Dionysius. It was not until 368 BCE that the Syracusan despot was able to reduce Entella; the city appears to have still remained in the hands of the Campanians, but was now hostile to the Carthaginians, who (in 345 BCE) in consequence ravaged its territory, and blockaded the city itself. Soon after we find the latter apparently in their hands, but it was recovered by Timoleon, who restored it to liberty and independence. From this time we hear little more of it. The name is only incidentally mentioned during the First Punic War, but it seems to have taken no part in the struggles between Rome and Carthage. It continued, however, to be a tolerably flourishing municipal town: its territory was fertile in wine ) as well as corn, and Cicero praises the inhabitants for their industry in its cultivation, but, like most of the cities of Sicily, it suffered severely from the exactions of Verres. We still find its name both in Pliny (among the populi stipendiarii) and Ptolemy but no further notice of it is found in ancient authors. It however continued to subsist throughout the Middle Ages, until the 13th century, when, having been converted into a stronghold by the Saracens, it was taken by the emperor Frederick II and utterly destroyed, the inhabitants being removed to Nocera near Naples. The site, which still retained its ancient name in the days of Fazello, is described by him as a position of great natural strength, surrounded by abrupt precipices on all sides but one, but having a table land of considerable extent on its summit. Its location at Rocca d'Entella, in the comune of Contessa Entellina, stands at an angle of the Belice, so that that river encircles it on the north and west. The ruins remaining there in the time of Fazello seem to have been only those of the mediaeval town and its Saracenic castle. There are extant coins of Entella, with the legend ΕΝΤΕΛΛΙΝΩΝ at full; while others struck under the Campanian occupation of the city have ΕΝΤΕΛΛΑΣ, and on the reverse ΚΑΜΠΑΝΩΝ. (en)
  • Cet article concerne la ville antique. Pour le club de football, voir Virtus Entella. Entella est un des cités élymes fondées en Sicile par une peuplade originaire de la Phrygie. Elle est située sur la rivière Hypsos à l'intérieur de la Sicile. Selon la mythologie grecque, si ce ne sont que des récits étiologiques, la fondation de la ville est étroitement liée à celle de Ségeste. Sous la pression d'un oracle déclarant qu'il faille sacrifier les jeunes filles pour apaiser le courroux des Dieux, que Laomédon, roi de Troie, fait exiler l'une d'elle, qui échoue en Sicile où elle enfante Aceste du dieu-fleuve local Crimissos. Aceste érige et nomme en l'hommage de sa mère la ville de Ségeste. Dans la continuité, certaines versions suggèrent également qu'Aceste ait aussi fondé les villes d'Éryx et d'Entella selon le nom des sœurs de cette jeune fille troyenne. Le nom d'Entella connait de nombreuses variantes comme Atalla (Ἄτταλλα) ou encore Enstylla (Ἒνστυλλα / Ènstulla) qui dévoile le prénom d'une femme Stylla (Στύλλα / Stúlla). L'historien grec Thucydide nous apprend par la suite que la partie occidentale de la Sicile, alors considérée comme le territoire des Sicanes, est peuplée par des Troyens fuyant la prise de leur ville après la guerre de Troie qui se fondent avec les autochtones et forment alors le peuple des Élymes. Entella semble avoir eu une certaine autonomie politique, grâce à ses rapports avec les phéniciens puis les communautés carthaginoises, au moins jusqu'en 404 av. J.-C.. La ville a battu sa propre monnaie en bronze et en argent, avant de passer sous le contrôle des Romains à l'époque de la Première guerre punique; ce fut alors le début de son déclin. (fr)
  • L'antica Entella era una delle antiche città della Sicilia tradizionalmente attribuite agli Elimi (assieme ad Erice, Segesta e Iaitas). Sorgeva sulla Rocca di Entella, lungo il corso del fiume Belice sinistro (antico Υψας, leggi Ipsas). Il sito si trova in una posizione strategica, dominando la visuale a 360° e divenendo una fortezza naturale. Oggi l'area ricade a nord-ovest del Comune di Contessa Entellina. (it)
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  • L'antica Entella era una delle antiche città della Sicilia tradizionalmente attribuite agli Elimi (assieme ad Erice, Segesta e Iaitas). Sorgeva sulla Rocca di Entella, lungo il corso del fiume Belice sinistro (antico Υψας, leggi Ipsas). Il sito si trova in una posizione strategica, dominando la visuale a 360° e divenendo una fortezza naturale. Oggi l'area ricade a nord-ovest del Comune di Contessa Entellina. (it)
  • Entella (Greek: Ἔντελλα), was an ancient city in the interior of Sicily, situated on the left bank of the river Hypsas (modern Belice), and nearly midway between the two seas, being about 40 km from the mouth of the Hypsas, and much about the same distance from the north coast of the island, at the Gulf of Castellamare. There are extant coins of Entella, with the legend ΕΝΤΕΛΛΙΝΩΝ at full; while others struck under the Campanian occupation of the city have ΕΝΤΕΛΛΑΣ, and on the reverse ΚΑΜΠΑΝΩΝ. (en)
  • Cet article concerne la ville antique. Pour le club de football, voir Virtus Entella. Entella est un des cités élymes fondées en Sicile par une peuplade originaire de la Phrygie. Elle est située sur la rivière Hypsos à l'intérieur de la Sicile. Entella semble avoir eu une certaine autonomie politique, grâce à ses rapports avec les phéniciens puis les communautés carthaginoises, au moins jusqu'en 404 av. J.-C.. La ville a battu sa propre monnaie en bronze et en argent, avant de passer sous le contrôle des Romains à l'époque de la Première guerre punique; ce fut alors le début de son déclin. (fr)
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  • Entella (en)
  • Entella (sito archeologico) (it)
  • Entella (fr)
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