Elsa Gindler (19 June 1885 – 8 January 1961) was a somatic bodywork pioneer in Germany. Born in Berlin, gymnastics teacher, student of Hedwig Kallmeyer (who, in turn, had been a student of Genevieve Stebbins). From her personal experience of recovering from an attack of tuberculosis (by concentrating to breathe with her healthy lung and rest the diseased lung) Gindler helped originate an entire school of bodywork, in close collaboration with Heinrich Jacoby.

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  • Elsa Gindler (* 19. Juni 1885 in Berlin; † 8. Januar 1961 in Berlin) war eine deutsche Gymnastiklehrerin, Begründerin einer modernen Form der Gymnastik und Bewegungstherapie. Da sie ihrer Schule weder einen theoretischen Überbau noch einen zugkräftigen Namen gab, wird heute häufig von „Gindler-Arbeit“ oder „Therapie nach Gindler“ gesprochen. Hauptmerkmal dieser Arbeit ist die behutsame Förderung der Selbsterfahrung und der Entfaltung der natürlichen Anlagen. Ihre Ansätze wurden von der Körpertherapie bzw. Körperpsychotherapie aufgenommen. (de)
  • Elsa Gindler (19 June 1885 – 8 January 1961) was a somatic bodywork pioneer in Germany. Born in Berlin, gymnastics teacher, student of Hedwig Kallmeyer (who, in turn, had been a student of Genevieve Stebbins). From her personal experience of recovering from an attack of tuberculosis (by concentrating to breathe with her healthy lung and rest the diseased lung) Gindler helped originate an entire school of bodywork, in close collaboration with Heinrich Jacoby. What Gindler had called Arbeit am Menschen (work on the human being) emphasised self-observation and growing understanding of one's individual physically related condition. Simple actions such as sitting, standing, walking etc. were explored, also in everyday situations. This became one of the bases of body psychotherapy since many of the most influential body psychotherapists studied with her or "Sensory Awareness" with Charlotte Selver at the Esalen Institute around 1962. Other influential students of Gindler include Elsa Lindenberg, the partner of Wilhelm Reich, Laura Perls, wife of Fritz Perls, and Carola Speads. During the Nazi-period of Germany, Gindler used these investigations and experimental exercises with her students to covertly help people who were persecuted by the regime. For her assistance to the Jewish population of Berlin, she was distinguished as a righteous among the nations and a tree was planted in Yad Vashem in her honour. (en)
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  • 1885-1-1
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  • 1961-1-1
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  • 7467294 (xsd:integer)
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  • 725195922 (xsd:integer)
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  • German Righteous Among the Nations (en)
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
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  • Elsa Gindler (* 19. Juni 1885 in Berlin; † 8. Januar 1961 in Berlin) war eine deutsche Gymnastiklehrerin, Begründerin einer modernen Form der Gymnastik und Bewegungstherapie. Da sie ihrer Schule weder einen theoretischen Überbau noch einen zugkräftigen Namen gab, wird heute häufig von „Gindler-Arbeit“ oder „Therapie nach Gindler“ gesprochen. Hauptmerkmal dieser Arbeit ist die behutsame Förderung der Selbsterfahrung und der Entfaltung der natürlichen Anlagen. Ihre Ansätze wurden von der Körpertherapie bzw. Körperpsychotherapie aufgenommen. (de)
  • Elsa Gindler (19 June 1885 – 8 January 1961) was a somatic bodywork pioneer in Germany. Born in Berlin, gymnastics teacher, student of Hedwig Kallmeyer (who, in turn, had been a student of Genevieve Stebbins). From her personal experience of recovering from an attack of tuberculosis (by concentrating to breathe with her healthy lung and rest the diseased lung) Gindler helped originate an entire school of bodywork, in close collaboration with Heinrich Jacoby. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Elsa Gindler (de)
  • Elsa Gindler (en)
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  • female (en)
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  • Elsa (en)
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  • Elsa Gindler (en)
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  • Gindler (en)
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