A double sunset is a rare astro-geographical phenomenon, in which the sun sets twice on the same evening from a specific place. The phenomenon is traditionally associated with the town of Leek, in Staffordshire, from where it is viewed on and around the summer solstice in good weather. The occurrence was first recorded in writing in 1686 by Dr Robert Plot in his book The Natural History Of Stafford-shire, although it has been argued that the first people to witness the spectacle may well have been Danish settlers from the Great Army, which invaded England in the ninth century. The traditional site for observing the phenomenon was the churchyard of Saint Edward the Confessor, from a particular point in which the whole of the sun set on the summit of The Cloud, a millstone grit hill six mile

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • A double sunset is a rare astro-geographical phenomenon, in which the sun sets twice on the same evening from a specific place. The phenomenon is traditionally associated with the town of Leek, in Staffordshire, from where it is viewed on and around the summer solstice in good weather. The occurrence was first recorded in writing in 1686 by Dr Robert Plot in his book The Natural History Of Stafford-shire, although it has been argued that the first people to witness the spectacle may well have been Danish settlers from the Great Army, which invaded England in the ninth century. The traditional site for observing the phenomenon was the churchyard of Saint Edward the Confessor, from a particular point in which the whole of the sun set on the summit of The Cloud, a millstone grit hill six miles to the northwest. The sun partially reappeared from The Cloud's steep northern slope and soon afterwards set for a second and final time on the horizon. The spectacle was last reliably witnessed, and filmed, from the churchyard in 1977, but is no longer visible from the location because of tree interference. It is, however, still observable from Leek on and around the summer solstice from the road to Pickwood Hall, off Milltown Way, and from Lowe Hill on the outskirts of the town. Better viewing points, though, are from the A 523, above Rudyard Reservoir, and Woodhouse Green, both of which are nearer to The Cloud and therefore enable a larger proportion of the sun to reappear. Further double sunsets were discovered by the writer Jeff Kent in 1997 from three places in west Derbyshire, observed against the limestone reef knolls, Chrome Hill, Parkhouse Hill and Thorpe Cloud. The Chrome Hill phenomenon is observed from Glutton Bridge for a short period around the summer solstice. The sun sets just to the southwest of the summit of the hill, begins to re-emerge almost immediately afterwards from its steep northeastern slope before fully reappearing and later sets for a second and final time at the foot of the hill. The Parkhouse Hill occurrence is visible from nearby Glutton Grange in late March, early April and September. The sun sets just to the south of the summit of the hill, begins to re-emerge almost immediately afterwards from its steep northern slope before fully reappearing and later sets for a second and final time at the foot of the hill. The Thorpe Cloud event is viewed from the top of nearby Lin Dale on and around the summer solstice and perhaps beyond. The sun sets on the summit of the hill, partially reappears from its steep northern slope and sets for a second and final time shortly afterwards. (en)
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 36408563 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 698769209 (xsd:integer)
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • A double sunset is a rare astro-geographical phenomenon, in which the sun sets twice on the same evening from a specific place. The phenomenon is traditionally associated with the town of Leek, in Staffordshire, from where it is viewed on and around the summer solstice in good weather. The occurrence was first recorded in writing in 1686 by Dr Robert Plot in his book The Natural History Of Stafford-shire, although it has been argued that the first people to witness the spectacle may well have been Danish settlers from the Great Army, which invaded England in the ninth century. The traditional site for observing the phenomenon was the churchyard of Saint Edward the Confessor, from a particular point in which the whole of the sun set on the summit of The Cloud, a millstone grit hill six mile (en)
rdfs:label
  • Double sunset (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dc:subject of
is foaf:primaryTopic of