The Dorr Rebellion (1841–1842) was a failed attempt to force broader democracy in the U.S. state of Rhode Island, where a small rural elite was in control of government. It was led by Thomas Wilson Dorr, who mobilized the disenfranchised to demand changes to the state's electoral rules. The state used as its constitution the 1663 colonial charter that required a man to own $134 in property to vote, and gave an equal weight in the Rhode Island General Assembly to all towns no matter what their population. The effect in the 1830s was that the rapidly growing industrial cities were far outnumbered in the legislature, to the annoyance of businessmen and industrialists. Furthermore, few immigrants or factory workers could vote, despite their growing numbers.

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  • The Dorr Rebellion (1841–1842) was a failed attempt to force broader democracy in the U.S. state of Rhode Island, where a small rural elite was in control of government. It was led by Thomas Wilson Dorr, who mobilized the disenfranchised to demand changes to the state's electoral rules. The state used as its constitution the 1663 colonial charter that required a man to own $134 in property to vote, and gave an equal weight in the Rhode Island General Assembly to all towns no matter what their population. The effect in the 1830s was that the rapidly growing industrial cities were far outnumbered in the legislature, to the annoyance of businessmen and industrialists. Furthermore, few immigrants or factory workers could vote, despite their growing numbers. All other states in 1840 saw a huge surge in turnout, but nothing happened in Rhode Island. At first, the middle classes took the lead, including Dorr himself. However, the Charter government, controlled by rural elites, fought back hard. For six weeks in 1842, there were two rival governments. The Dorrites, led by self-proclaimed governor Dorr, pulled back from violence (after their cannon misfired). Only one person died, a bystander killed by accident. The Charter government compromised. It wrote a new constitution in 1843 that dropped the property requirement for men born in the United States but kept it for foreign-born citizens, and it gave more seats in the legislature to the cities. That satisfied the native-born protesters, who gave up on the Rhode Island Suffrage Association. The state government had the upper hand; the national government refused to intervene, and Democrats in other states gave Dorr only verbal encouragement. His cause was hopeless—he and five lieutenants were sentenced to life in prison. They were pardoned in 1845 when the agitation had ended. Not until 1888 were the property qualifications dropped for immigrants. In the next Presidential election held after the Dorr Rebellion in 1844, 12,296 votes were cast from Rhode Island, a significant increase from the 8,621 cast in 1840. (en)
  • La Rébellion de Dorr est une insurrection armée à Rhode Island en 1841 et 1842, menée par Thomas Wilson Dorr qui voulait changer le système électoral de l'état. (fr)
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  • Charterites
  • Dorrites
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  • Charterite victory
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  • 374424 (xsd:integer)
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  • 743659534 (xsd:integer)
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  • A polemic applauding Democratic support of the Dorrite cause in Rhode Island, 1844
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  • 1841 (xsd:integer)
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
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  • La Rébellion de Dorr est une insurrection armée à Rhode Island en 1841 et 1842, menée par Thomas Wilson Dorr qui voulait changer le système électoral de l'état. (fr)
  • The Dorr Rebellion (1841–1842) was a failed attempt to force broader democracy in the U.S. state of Rhode Island, where a small rural elite was in control of government. It was led by Thomas Wilson Dorr, who mobilized the disenfranchised to demand changes to the state's electoral rules. The state used as its constitution the 1663 colonial charter that required a man to own $134 in property to vote, and gave an equal weight in the Rhode Island General Assembly to all towns no matter what their population. The effect in the 1830s was that the rapidly growing industrial cities were far outnumbered in the legislature, to the annoyance of businessmen and industrialists. Furthermore, few immigrants or factory workers could vote, despite their growing numbers. (en)
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  • Dorr Rebellion (en)
  • Rébellion de Dorr (fr)
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  • Dorr Rebellion (en)
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