Dan Jack Combs (August 22, 1924 – May 25, 2002) was a Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals from 1983 to 1989 and the Kentucky Supreme Court from 1989 to 1993. Combs rose to national prominence by successfully defending Appalachian Volunteers Margaret and Alan McSurely against charges of sedition in a case that took 15 years to fully adjudicate. After a long legal career, Combs unseated incumbent Elijah M. Hogge for a seat on the Kentucky Court of Appeals. In 1989, he challenged incumbent James B. Stephenson for his seat on the Kentucky Supreme Court. During the campaign, he attacked some of Stephenson's previous opinions in violation of a state judicial code that forbade judicial candidates from stating opinions related to cases they might later be asked to rule on. After the election,

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dbo:abstract
  • Dan Jack Combs (August 22, 1924 – May 25, 2002) was a Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals from 1983 to 1989 and the Kentucky Supreme Court from 1989 to 1993. Combs rose to national prominence by successfully defending Appalachian Volunteers Margaret and Alan McSurely against charges of sedition in a case that took 15 years to fully adjudicate. After a long legal career, Combs unseated incumbent Elijah M. Hogge for a seat on the Kentucky Court of Appeals. In 1989, he challenged incumbent James B. Stephenson for his seat on the Kentucky Supreme Court. During the campaign, he attacked some of Stephenson's previous opinions in violation of a state judicial code that forbade judicial candidates from stating opinions related to cases they might later be asked to rule on. After the election, which Combs won, he was suspended for three months for violating the code, but the suspension was not carried out because Combs appealed the constitutionality of the code and eventually succeeded in overturning it. Throughout his tenure on the court, Combs was known as being sympathetic to unpopular litigants and causes. He retired from the court in 1993, citing ill health stemming from a motorcycle accident and two strokes. In retirement, he was twice arrested on marijuana-related charges. He admitted using the drug medicinally to help with insomnia and became an advocate for its legalization. He died at home on May 25, 2002. (en)
dbo:almaMater
dbo:birthDate
  • 1924-08-22 (xsd:date)
  • 1924-8-22
dbo:birthPlace
dbo:deathDate
  • 2002-05-25 (xsd:date)
  • 2002-5-25
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  • 47607271 (xsd:integer)
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  • 737891830 (xsd:integer)
dbp:allegiance
dbp:battles
dbp:birthName
  • Dan Jack Combs
dbp:branch
dbp:office
  • Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals
  • Justice of the Kentucky Supreme Court
dbp:predecessor
dbp:profession
  • Lawyer; judge
dbp:restingPlace
  • Combs family cemetery
dbp:successor
dbp:termEnd
  • 1989 (xsd:integer)
  • 1993-06-30 (xsd:date)
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  • 1983 (xsd:integer)
  • 1989-01-09 (xsd:date)
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Dan Jack Combs (August 22, 1924 – May 25, 2002) was a Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals from 1983 to 1989 and the Kentucky Supreme Court from 1989 to 1993. Combs rose to national prominence by successfully defending Appalachian Volunteers Margaret and Alan McSurely against charges of sedition in a case that took 15 years to fully adjudicate. After a long legal career, Combs unseated incumbent Elijah M. Hogge for a seat on the Kentucky Court of Appeals. In 1989, he challenged incumbent James B. Stephenson for his seat on the Kentucky Supreme Court. During the campaign, he attacked some of Stephenson's previous opinions in violation of a state judicial code that forbade judicial candidates from stating opinions related to cases they might later be asked to rule on. After the election, (en)
rdfs:label
  • Dan Jack Combs (en)
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  • male (en)
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  • Dan Jack Combs (en)
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