Many works by several composers influenced Mendelssohn's composition of this piece. It is likely that Mendelssohn drew this unusual pairing of solo piano and violin from Johann Hummel's own Concerto for Piano, Violin, and Orchestra in G major, Op. 17, with whom he had briefly studied with in 1821. The young Mendelssohn was also influenced by Carl Maria von Weber and frequently performed his Konzertstück in F minor. Mendelssohn's appreciation for Rode, Viotti, and Kreutzer, all of whom are from the French violin school, is evident in his writing for the solo violin. Techniques used include portato, slurred staccato, and figures that suggest portamento. Mendelssohn's concerto is similar in structure to Weber's Piano Concerto No. 2 in E-flat major, Op. 32. From Mendelssohn's own works, the us

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dbo:abstract
  • Many works by several composers influenced Mendelssohn's composition of this piece. It is likely that Mendelssohn drew this unusual pairing of solo piano and violin from Johann Hummel's own Concerto for Piano, Violin, and Orchestra in G major, Op. 17, with whom he had briefly studied with in 1821. The young Mendelssohn was also influenced by Carl Maria von Weber and frequently performed his Konzertstück in F minor. Mendelssohn's appreciation for Rode, Viotti, and Kreutzer, all of whom are from the French violin school, is evident in his writing for the solo violin. Techniques used include portato, slurred staccato, and figures that suggest portamento. Mendelssohn's concerto is similar in structure to Weber's Piano Concerto No. 2 in E-flat major, Op. 32. From Mendelssohn's own works, the use of just a string section as orchestral accompaniment is reminiscent of his String Symphonies, having had written twelve by the end of the year and are all influenced by C.P.E. Bach's Sinfonias. There are three movements: 1. * Allegro (D minor) 2. * Adagio (A major) 3. * Allegro molto (D minor) (en)
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dbo:wikiPageID
  • 48783223 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 742595562 (xsd:integer)
dbp:caption
  • Mendelssohn in 1821, age 12
dbp:catalogue
  • MWV O 4
dbp:cname
  • Concerto for Piano, Violin, and Strings
dbp:composer
dbp:genre
dbp:key
  • D minor
dbp:movements
  • 3 (xsd:integer)
dbp:period
dbp:premiereDate
  • 1823-05-25 (xsd:date)
dbp:scoring
  • Piano, violin solo, strings , winds, timpani
dbp:work
  • Concerto for Violin, Piano and Strings in D minor, MWV O 4
dct:subject
rdfs:comment
  • Many works by several composers influenced Mendelssohn's composition of this piece. It is likely that Mendelssohn drew this unusual pairing of solo piano and violin from Johann Hummel's own Concerto for Piano, Violin, and Orchestra in G major, Op. 17, with whom he had briefly studied with in 1821. The young Mendelssohn was also influenced by Carl Maria von Weber and frequently performed his Konzertstück in F minor. Mendelssohn's appreciation for Rode, Viotti, and Kreutzer, all of whom are from the French violin school, is evident in his writing for the solo violin. Techniques used include portato, slurred staccato, and figures that suggest portamento. Mendelssohn's concerto is similar in structure to Weber's Piano Concerto No. 2 in E-flat major, Op. 32. From Mendelssohn's own works, the us (en)
rdfs:label
  • Concerto for Piano, Violin and Strings (Mendelssohn) (en)
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