Charles Kanaʻina, officially referred to as His Honour and His Highness, (Kanaʻina II) (c. 1801 – March 13, 1877) was an aliʻi (hereditary noble) of the Kingdom of Hawaii and father of William Charles Lunalilo, the 6th monarch of the Kamehameha Dynasty. Kanaʻina was a descendant of several figures from ancient Hawaiian history, including Liloa, Hakau and Umi-a-Liloa of Hawaiʻi Island as well as Piilani of Maui. He served on both the Privy Counsel and in the House of Nobles. He was named after his uncle Kanaʻina, a name that means "The conquering" in the Hawaiian Language. This uncle greeted Captain James Cook in 1778 and confronted the navigator before he was killed.

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dbo:abstract
  • Charles Kanaʻina, officially referred to as His Honour and His Highness, (Kanaʻina II) (c. 1801 – March 13, 1877) was an aliʻi (hereditary noble) of the Kingdom of Hawaii and father of William Charles Lunalilo, the 6th monarch of the Kamehameha Dynasty. Kanaʻina was a descendant of several figures from ancient Hawaiian history, including Liloa, Hakau and Umi-a-Liloa of Hawaiʻi Island as well as Piilani of Maui. He served on both the Privy Counsel and in the House of Nobles. He was named after his uncle Kanaʻina, a name that means "The conquering" in the Hawaiian Language. This uncle greeted Captain James Cook in 1778 and confronted the navigator before he was killed. His wife Miriam Auhea Kekāuluohi was a widow and niece of Kamehameha I. She was also Married to Kamehameha II before he converted to Christianity and gave up all but one wife. Kanaʻina and Kekāuluohi lived in a traditional aliʻi style home in a sacred neighborhood in Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii called Pohukaina near Kekūanāoa, Kaʻahumanu and their offspring. The compound would eventually become the official Royal Residence of the Hawaiian Royal Family when Kekūanāoa would build Hale Aliʻi in the center of the families estates as a gift to his daughter Victoria Kamāmalu. The site would become the Iolani Palace and Palace Walk. Kanaʻina kept his property at the palace until his death and would be the only original owner to do so while the Palace was in use, living there from Kamehameha II up to Kalakaua. Kanaʻina's son, William Charles Lunalilo, was named by Kamehameha III as an heir to the throne of the kingdom and ascended in 1873 while his father still lived. Lunalilo died only a year later, three years before his father's death. Kanaʻina died on March 13, 1877. He had not re-written his will and when produced still left everything to his son Lunalilo. Having died intestate, probate hearings proceeded for 5 years. Final adjudication went to several of Kanaʻina's cousins including Ruth Keelikōlani and Bernice Pauahi Bishop. (en)
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  • 1801-1-1
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  • 1877-03-13 (xsd:date)
  • 1877-3-13
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dbo:occupation
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dbo:title
  • His Honour/His Highness (en)
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  • 16916083 (xsd:integer)
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  • 744504615 (xsd:integer)
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  • 1801 (xsd:integer)
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  • Napoʻopoʻo, Hawaiʻi
dbp:burialDate
  • 1877-03-29 (xsd:date)
dbp:father
  • [Eia] Ka-makakaualii
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  • Kamehameha Dynasty
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  • 250 (xsd:integer)
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  • Kauwa Palila
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  • Kanaina sig.jpg
dct:description
  • Hawaiian noble and father of King Lunalilo (en)
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Charles Kanaʻina, officially referred to as His Honour and His Highness, (Kanaʻina II) (c. 1801 – March 13, 1877) was an aliʻi (hereditary noble) of the Kingdom of Hawaii and father of William Charles Lunalilo, the 6th monarch of the Kamehameha Dynasty. Kanaʻina was a descendant of several figures from ancient Hawaiian history, including Liloa, Hakau and Umi-a-Liloa of Hawaiʻi Island as well as Piilani of Maui. He served on both the Privy Counsel and in the House of Nobles. He was named after his uncle Kanaʻina, a name that means "The conquering" in the Hawaiian Language. This uncle greeted Captain James Cook in 1778 and confronted the navigator before he was killed. (en)
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  • Charles Kanaʻina (en)
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  • male (en)
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  • Charles (en)
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  • Charles Kanaina (en)
  • Kanaina II (en)
foaf:surname
  • Kanaina (en)
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