In 1920, Villa-Lobos composed a guitar piece first titled Chôro típico, and slightly later republished as Chôro típico brasileiro, taking his title from an improvisational genre of Brazilian instrumental popular music that originated in Rio de Janeiro in the nineteenth century. The Portuguese word choro (pronounced [ˈʃoɾu]), means "cry" or "lament", though most music of this type is far from being sorrowful. Four years later, at the time of his first visit to Paris, he decided to create an extended cycle of works collectively titled Chôros. The guitar composition became No. 1 in that series, and Chôros No. 2 was composed in Rio de Janeiro in 1924. The score is dedicated to Mário de Andrade. It was premiered at the Teatro Sant'Anna in São Paulo on 18 February 1925 by Spartaco Rossi (flute),

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dbo:abstract
  • In 1920, Villa-Lobos composed a guitar piece first titled Chôro típico, and slightly later republished as Chôro típico brasileiro, taking his title from an improvisational genre of Brazilian instrumental popular music that originated in Rio de Janeiro in the nineteenth century. The Portuguese word choro (pronounced [ˈʃoɾu]), means "cry" or "lament", though most music of this type is far from being sorrowful. Four years later, at the time of his first visit to Paris, he decided to create an extended cycle of works collectively titled Chôros. The guitar composition became No. 1 in that series, and Chôros No. 2 was composed in Rio de Janeiro in 1924. The score is dedicated to Mário de Andrade. It was premiered at the Teatro Sant'Anna in São Paulo on 18 February 1925 by Spartaco Rossi (flute), and Antenor Driussi (clarinet), as part of a concert in homage to Olívia Guedes Penteado and Paulo Prado. The European premiere was given by Gaston Blanquart (flute), and Louis Cahuzac (clarinet), at the Salle Gaveau in Paris on 24 October 1927, on the first of a pair of concerts devoted to works by Villa-Lobos. The composer transcribed the work for piano in the year in which it was composed (, 21, 129–30). (en)
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dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 49990908 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 743743114 (xsd:integer)
dbp:caption
  • Heitor Villa-Lobos
dbp:catalogue
  • W197
dbp:composer
dbp:dedication
dbp:duration
  • 2.500000 (xsd:double)
dbp:firstRecording
  • Ary Ferreira , Antão Soares
dbp:form
  • Chôros
dbp:genre
dbp:movements
  • 1 (xsd:integer)
dbp:name
  • Chôros No. 2
dbp:nativeNameLang
  • Portuguese
dbp:premiereDate
  • 1925-02-18 (xsd:date)
dbp:premiereLocation
  • Teatro Sant'Anna, São Paulo
dbp:premierePerformers
  • Spartaco Rossi , Antenor Driussi
dbp:publisher
  • Max Eschig
dbp:reference
  • Peppercorn, Lisa M. 1991. Villa-Lobos: The Music: An Analysis of His Style, translated by Stefan de Haan. London: Kahn & Averill; White Plains, NY: Pro/Am Music Resources Inc. ISBN 1-871082-15-3 ; ISBN 0-912483-36-9.
  • Villa-Lobos, sua obra. 2009. Version 1.0. MinC / IBRAM, and the Museu Villa-Lobos. Based on the third edition, 1989.
  • Salles, Paulo de Tarso. 2009. Villa-Lobos: processos composicionais. Campinas, SP: Editora da Unicamp. ISBN 978-85-268-0853-9.
  • Negwer, Manuel. 2008. Villa-Lobos: Der Aufbruch der brasilianischen Musik. Mainz: Schott Music. ISBN 3-7957-0168-6. Portuguese version as Villa Lobos e o florescimento da música brasileira. São Paulo: Martins Fontes, 2009. ISBN 978-85-61635-40-4.
  • Nóbrega, Adhemar Alves da. 1975. Os chôros de Villa-Lobos. Rio de Janeiro: Museu Villa-Lobos.
  • Tarasti, Eero. 1995. Heitor Villa-Lobos: The Life and Works, 1887–1959, translated from the Finnish by the author. Jefferson, NC, and London: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. ISBN 0-7864-0013-7.
  • Villa-Lobos, Heitor. 1972. "Choros: Estudo técnico, estético e psicológico", edited in 1950 by Adhemar Nóbrega. In Villa-Lobos, sua obra, second edition, 198–210. Rio de Janeiro: MEC/DAC/Museu Villa-Lobos.
  • Gaertner, Leandro. 2008. "Análise para intérpretes do Choros 2 de Heitor Villa-Lobos." Música Hodie 8, no. 2 : 53–81.
  • Béhague, Gerard. 1994. Villa-Lobos: The Search for Brazil's Musical Soul. Austin: Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, 1994. ISBN 0-292-70823-8.
  • Moreira, Gabriel Ferrão. 2014. "A construção da sonoridade modernista de Heitor Villa-Lobos por meio de processos harmônicos: um estudo sobre os Choros". PhD diss. São Paulo: Universidade do Estado de São Paulo.
  • Peppercorn, Lisa M. 1980. "A Villa-Lobos Autograph Letter at the Bibliothèque Nationale ". Latin American Music Review / Revista de Música Latinoamericana 1, no. 2 : 253–64.
dbp:scoring
  • Flute and clarinet
dct:subject
rdfs:comment
  • In 1920, Villa-Lobos composed a guitar piece first titled Chôro típico, and slightly later republished as Chôro típico brasileiro, taking his title from an improvisational genre of Brazilian instrumental popular music that originated in Rio de Janeiro in the nineteenth century. The Portuguese word choro (pronounced [ˈʃoɾu]), means "cry" or "lament", though most music of this type is far from being sorrowful. Four years later, at the time of his first visit to Paris, he decided to create an extended cycle of works collectively titled Chôros. The guitar composition became No. 1 in that series, and Chôros No. 2 was composed in Rio de Janeiro in 1924. The score is dedicated to Mário de Andrade. It was premiered at the Teatro Sant'Anna in São Paulo on 18 February 1925 by Spartaco Rossi (flute), (en)
rdfs:label
  • Chôros No. 2 (en)
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