The term British subject has had a number of different legal meanings over time. Formerly 'British subject' was used to denote de facto citizenship of the United Kingdom and the British Empire, and until 1949 was used to refer generally to any person born or naturalised in the United Kingdom or the British Empire, including the independent dominions (but not including protectorates). The term had a more complex interpretation between 1949 and 1983 and the move to independence of many of the colonies, with subject status existing alongside citizenship of an individual country or colony.

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dbo:abstract
  • The term British subject has had a number of different legal meanings over time. Formerly 'British subject' was used to denote de facto citizenship of the United Kingdom and the British Empire, and until 1949 was used to refer generally to any person born or naturalised in the United Kingdom or the British Empire, including the independent dominions (but not including protectorates). The term had a more complex interpretation between 1949 and 1983 and the move to independence of many of the colonies, with subject status existing alongside citizenship of an individual country or colony. Currently the term 'British subject' refers, in British nationality law, to a limited class of people defined by Part IV of the British Nationality Act 1981. Under that Act, two groups of people became "British subjects"; the first were people from the Republic of Ireland born before 1949 who already claimed subject status, and the second covered a number of people who had previously been considered "British subjects without citizenship", and were not considered citizens of any other country. This second group were predominantly residents of colonies which had become independent, but who had not become citizens of the new country. The status cannot be inherited, and is lost on the acquisition of any other citizenship; it will therefore cease to exist on the death of the last remaining subjects. The term 'subject' is used rather than 'citizen' because in a monarchy the monarch is the source of authority in whose name all legal power in civil and military law is exercised. The people of a monarchy in former times were regarded as the monarch's subjects who were under certain obligations such as owing allegiance to, and thereby entitled to the protection of, the Crown. (en)
  • En la ley de nacionalidad británica, el término de súbdito británico (en inglés: British subject) ha tenido diferentes significados en distintos puntos de la historia. La definición actual del término de "súbdito británico" está contenida en el Acta de Nacionalidad Británica de 1981. (es)
  • 英籍人士(英语:British subject),又作英國臣民和英國子民等,是英國國籍法之下的一種英國國籍。現行對英籍人士的定義主要由《1981年英國國籍法令》等法律文件詮釋,根據1981年的法令,絕大部份英籍人士主要都是那些生於1949年1月1日以前,但只保留英籍人士身份而沒有其他國籍的人士。當中這類人士又以在1949年1月1日以前個別生於愛爾蘭和英屬印度的人士為主;此外,個別無國籍人士如果符合資格,也可登記為英籍人士。不過,一般估計只有極少數人士擁有英籍人士國籍。 歷史上,大英帝國治下的臣民基本上都是英籍人士,但自《1948年英國國籍法令》生效後,英國及其殖民地設立了英國及殖民地公民國籍,而各英聯邦成員國也相繼制訂屬於自己的國籍,因此英籍人士僅保留作為英國、各殖民地、與各英聯邦成員國人民之間共同享有的身份,與英聯邦公民同義。及至《1981年英國國籍法令》在1983年生效後,英籍人士的定義被大幅修訂和收窄,而符合英籍人士定義者,僅佔少數。在日常場合中,英籍人士偶爾也可被籠統理解為英國國民或英國人等。 (zh)
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  • En la ley de nacionalidad británica, el término de súbdito británico (en inglés: British subject) ha tenido diferentes significados en distintos puntos de la historia. La definición actual del término de "súbdito británico" está contenida en el Acta de Nacionalidad Británica de 1981. (es)
  • 英籍人士(英语:British subject),又作英國臣民和英國子民等,是英國國籍法之下的一種英國國籍。現行對英籍人士的定義主要由《1981年英國國籍法令》等法律文件詮釋,根據1981年的法令,絕大部份英籍人士主要都是那些生於1949年1月1日以前,但只保留英籍人士身份而沒有其他國籍的人士。當中這類人士又以在1949年1月1日以前個別生於愛爾蘭和英屬印度的人士為主;此外,個別無國籍人士如果符合資格,也可登記為英籍人士。不過,一般估計只有極少數人士擁有英籍人士國籍。 歷史上,大英帝國治下的臣民基本上都是英籍人士,但自《1948年英國國籍法令》生效後,英國及其殖民地設立了英國及殖民地公民國籍,而各英聯邦成員國也相繼制訂屬於自己的國籍,因此英籍人士僅保留作為英國、各殖民地、與各英聯邦成員國人民之間共同享有的身份,與英聯邦公民同義。及至《1981年英國國籍法令》在1983年生效後,英籍人士的定義被大幅修訂和收窄,而符合英籍人士定義者,僅佔少數。在日常場合中,英籍人士偶爾也可被籠統理解為英國國民或英國人等。 (zh)
  • The term British subject has had a number of different legal meanings over time. Formerly 'British subject' was used to denote de facto citizenship of the United Kingdom and the British Empire, and until 1949 was used to refer generally to any person born or naturalised in the United Kingdom or the British Empire, including the independent dominions (but not including protectorates). The term had a more complex interpretation between 1949 and 1983 and the move to independence of many of the colonies, with subject status existing alongside citizenship of an individual country or colony. (en)
rdfs:label
  • British subject (en)
  • Súbdito británico (es)
  • 英籍人士 (zh)
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