The Bell Labs Digital Synthesizer, better known as the Alles Machine or Alice, was an experimental additive synthesizer designed by Hal Alles at Bell Labs during the 1970s. The Alles Machine used 64 computer-controlled oscillators whose output was mixed to produce a number of discrete "voices" for output. The Alles Machine has been called the first true digital additive synthesizer, following on earlier Bell experiments that were partially or wholly implemented as software on large computers. Only one full-length composition was recorded for the machine, before it was disassembled and donated to Oberlin Conservatory's TIMARA department in 1981. Several commercial synthesizers based on the Alles design were released during the 1980s, including the Atari AMY sound chip.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • ベルラボ・ディジタルシンセサイザー (Bell Labs Digital Synthesizer; 一般には アレス・マシーン (Alles Machine) または アリス (Alice) の名で知られる) は、1970年代にベル研究所のハル・アレス (Hal Alles)が設計した実験的アディティブ・シンセサイザーである。 アレス・マシーンは計72個のコンピュータ制御式オシレータを備え、アディティブ・シンセシス(加算合成)の手法でオシレータ出力をミックスして複数の楽音(ヴォイス)を合成した。アレス・マシーンは、ベル研究所の先行実験 —— 一部または全体を大型コンピュータ上のソフトウェアとして実装 —— の後を引き継ぐ、「最初の真のデジタル・アディティブ・シンセサイザー」と呼ばれている。 アレス・マシーンによる完全な楽曲録音はただ一曲のみで、その後分解され1981年オーバリン・カレッジ音楽院TIMARAに寄贈された。 1980年代には、アレスの設計に基づくシンセサイザー製品がいくつか発売されている: Crumar GDS (1980, GDS:General Development System), DKI Synergy (1981), Atari AMY 1 サウンドチップ (1984), Mulogix Slave 32 (1985) (ja)
  • The Bell Labs Digital Synthesizer, better known as the Alles Machine or Alice, was an experimental additive synthesizer designed by Hal Alles at Bell Labs during the 1970s. The Alles Machine used 64 computer-controlled oscillators whose output was mixed to produce a number of discrete "voices" for output. The Alles Machine has been called the first true digital additive synthesizer, following on earlier Bell experiments that were partially or wholly implemented as software on large computers. Only one full-length composition was recorded for the machine, before it was disassembled and donated to Oberlin Conservatory's TIMARA department in 1981. Several commercial synthesizers based on the Alles design were released during the 1980s, including the Atari AMY sound chip. (en)
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 26727390 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 732927876 (xsd:integer)
dbp:date
  • 20120227145330 (xsd:double)
  • 20120314082332 (xsd:double)
  • August 2016
dbp:fixAttempted
  • yes
dbp:url
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • ベルラボ・ディジタルシンセサイザー (Bell Labs Digital Synthesizer; 一般には アレス・マシーン (Alles Machine) または アリス (Alice) の名で知られる) は、1970年代にベル研究所のハル・アレス (Hal Alles)が設計した実験的アディティブ・シンセサイザーである。 アレス・マシーンは計72個のコンピュータ制御式オシレータを備え、アディティブ・シンセシス(加算合成)の手法でオシレータ出力をミックスして複数の楽音(ヴォイス)を合成した。アレス・マシーンは、ベル研究所の先行実験 —— 一部または全体を大型コンピュータ上のソフトウェアとして実装 —— の後を引き継ぐ、「最初の真のデジタル・アディティブ・シンセサイザー」と呼ばれている。 アレス・マシーンによる完全な楽曲録音はただ一曲のみで、その後分解され1981年オーバリン・カレッジ音楽院TIMARAに寄贈された。 1980年代には、アレスの設計に基づくシンセサイザー製品がいくつか発売されている: Crumar GDS (1980, GDS:General Development System), DKI Synergy (1981), Atari AMY 1 サウンドチップ (1984), Mulogix Slave 32 (1985) (ja)
  • The Bell Labs Digital Synthesizer, better known as the Alles Machine or Alice, was an experimental additive synthesizer designed by Hal Alles at Bell Labs during the 1970s. The Alles Machine used 64 computer-controlled oscillators whose output was mixed to produce a number of discrete "voices" for output. The Alles Machine has been called the first true digital additive synthesizer, following on earlier Bell experiments that were partially or wholly implemented as software on large computers. Only one full-length composition was recorded for the machine, before it was disassembled and donated to Oberlin Conservatory's TIMARA department in 1981. Several commercial synthesizers based on the Alles design were released during the 1980s, including the Atari AMY sound chip. (en)
rdfs:label
  • ベルラボ・ディジタルシンセサイザー (ja)
  • Bell Labs Digital Synthesizer (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of