Amorite is an early Northwest Semitic language, spoken by the Amorite tribes prominent in ancient Near Eastern history. It is known exclusively from non-Akkadian proper names recorded by Akkadian scribes during periods of Amorite rule in Babylonia (end of the 3rd and beginning of the 2nd millennium), notably from Mari, and to a lesser extent Alalakh, Tell Harmal, and Khafajah.

PropertyValue
dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • Amorite is an early Northwest Semitic language, spoken by the Amorite tribes prominent in ancient Near Eastern history. It is known exclusively from non-Akkadian proper names recorded by Akkadian scribes during periods of Amorite rule in Babylonia (end of the 3rd and beginning of the 2nd millennium), notably from Mari, and to a lesser extent Alalakh, Tell Harmal, and Khafajah. Occasionally such names are also found in early Egyptian texts; and one place-name — "Sənīr" (שְׂנִיר) for Mount Hermon — is known from the Bible, and oddly enough may be Indo-European in origin (possibly due to Hittite influence). Notable characteristics include: The usual Northwest Semitic imperfective-perfective distinction is found — e.g. Yantin-Dagan, 'Dagon gives' (ntn); Raṣa-Dagan, 'Dagon was pleased' (rṣy). It included a 3rd-person suffix -a, and an imperfect vowel -a-, as in Arabic rather than the Hebrew and Aramaic -i-. There was a verb form with a geminate second consonant — e.g. Yabanni-Il, 'God creates' (root bny). In several cases where Akkadian has š, Amorite, like Hebrew and Arabic, has h, thus hu 'his', -haa 'her', causative h- or ʼ- (I. Gelb 1958). The 1st-person perfect is in -ti (singular), -nu (plural), as in the Canaanite languages.
  • L’amorrite est une langue sémitique, parlée par le peuple amorrite ayant vécu en Syrie, en haute et basse Mésopotamie entre la fin du III millénaire et le début du II millénaire av.  J. -C. Cette langue est encore fortement marquée d’archaïsmes comme le montre son système phonologique ainsi qu’un certain nombre d’isoglosses avec l’akkadien. Seules la fréquence de certains parallélismes et la proximité de son lexique avec l’hébreu, l’araméen ou l’ougaritique font, selon toute vraisemblance, de l’amorrite une langue cananéenne. Pour G. Garbini il s’agit d’une langue structurellement nouvelle dans laquelle il voit « a kind of modernization of a language of Eblaite type. This means, that if Amorites conquer new lands and cities, other languages may accept the same modernisation without losing much of their own identities : this is what I have called amoritization ».
  • Język amorycki – język semicki używany od połowy III do II tysiąclecia p.n.e. przez Amorytów, tj. lud, który przybył z zachodu i osiadł na obszarach Syrii i Palestyny. Językiem amoryckim posługiwano się także w północnej i środkowej części Mezopotamii. Ponieważ Amoryci byli ludem półkoczowniczym, nie stworzyli sposobu zapisu własnego języka. Po zdobyciu dominacji w regionie przejęli pismo i język akadyjski. Język został poświadczony przez zabytki z Ebli, Ur, Mari, Ugarit i Emar.
dbpedia-owl:languageFamily
dbpedia-owl:spokenIn
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageID
  • 593589 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageInLinkCount
  • 12 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageOutLinkCount
  • 34 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 540365752 (xsd:integer)
dbpprop:extinct
  • 2 (xsd:integer)
dbpprop:fam
dbpprop:familycolor
  • Afro-Asiatic
dbpprop:hasPhotoCollection
dbpprop:iso
  • none
dbpprop:name
  • Amorite
dbpprop:states
  • ancient Mesopotamia, by the Amorites
dbpprop:wordnet_type
dcterms:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Amorite is an early Northwest Semitic language, spoken by the Amorite tribes prominent in ancient Near Eastern history. It is known exclusively from non-Akkadian proper names recorded by Akkadian scribes during periods of Amorite rule in Babylonia (end of the 3rd and beginning of the 2nd millennium), notably from Mari, and to a lesser extent Alalakh, Tell Harmal, and Khafajah.
  • L’amorrite est une langue sémitique, parlée par le peuple amorrite ayant vécu en Syrie, en haute et basse Mésopotamie entre la fin du III millénaire et le début du II millénaire av.  J. -C. Cette langue est encore fortement marquée d’archaïsmes comme le montre son système phonologique ainsi qu’un certain nombre d’isoglosses avec l’akkadien.
  • Język amorycki – język semicki używany od połowy III do II tysiąclecia p.n.e. przez Amorytów, tj. lud, który przybył z zachodu i osiadł na obszarach Syrii i Palestyny. Językiem amoryckim posługiwano się także w północnej i środkowej części Mezopotamii. Ponieważ Amoryci byli ludem półkoczowniczym, nie stworzyli sposobu zapisu własnego języka. Po zdobyciu dominacji w regionie przejęli pismo i język akadyjski. Język został poświadczony przez zabytki z Ebli, Ur, Mari, Ugarit i Emar.
rdfs:label
  • Amorite language
  • Amorrite
  • Język amorycki
owl:sameAs
http://www.w3.org/ns/prov#wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Amorite
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbpprop:child of
is owl:sameAs of
is foaf:primaryTopic of