Alfred Wolfsohn (23 September 1896 – 5 February 1962) was a German singing teacher who suffered persistent auditory hallucination of screaming soldiers, whom he had witnessed dying of wounds while serving as a stretcher bearer in the trenches of World War I. After being subsequently diagnosed with Shell Shock, Wolfsohn failed to recover in response to hospitalization or psychiatric treatment, but cured himself by vocalizing extreme sounds, bringing about what he described as a combination of catharsis and exorcism. When Wolfsohn died in 1962, the group of long-standing students divided.

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  • Alfred Wolfsohn (né le 23 septembre 1896 - mort le 5 février 1962) était un professeur de chant allemand. Il eut pour élève Paula Lindberg, la belle-mère de Charlotte Salomon, et figure dans les peintures de cette dernière sous le nom d'Amadeus Daberlohn. Il est le fondateur d'une méthode de développement de la voix connue aujourd'hui sous le nom d'approche Roy Hart Theatre. Il fut un pionnier du domaine de la recherche vocale et ses études ont révélé le potentiel de la voix non seulement comme instrument d'expression artistique, mais aussi comme instrument de développement personnel et de thérapie. Le but de Wolfsohn était de développer une voix libre, sans chaînes, qu'il appelait la Voix du Futur. (fr)
  • Alfred Wolfsohn (23 September 1896 – 5 February 1962) was a German singing teacher who suffered persistent auditory hallucination of screaming soldiers, whom he had witnessed dying of wounds while serving as a stretcher bearer in the trenches of World War I. After being subsequently diagnosed with Shell Shock, Wolfsohn failed to recover in response to hospitalization or psychiatric treatment, but cured himself by vocalizing extreme sounds, bringing about what he described as a combination of catharsis and exorcism. Inspired by the range and expressiveness of his voice, which resulted from the vocal exercises and techniques he developed in an attempt to heal the symptoms of trauma sustained during the war, Wolfsohn began teaching others, acting as both a singing teacher and psychotherapist, seeking to combine the principles of both disciplines. Wolfsohn had no formal training in either field, but nonetheless became a critic of traditional vocal pedagogy and an advocate for the principles of Analytical Psychology developed by Carl Jung. Wolfsohn began his teaching in Berlin, whilst working with the opera singer Paula Salomon-Lindberg where he developed a close mentoring relationship with the painter Charlotte Salomon. Wolfsohn and his theories inspired Charlotte Salomon to create her artwork Leben? Oder Theater? Ein Singespiel, assigning to him the name Amadeus Daberlohn. After escaping Nazi Germany, Wolfsohn came to London and established the Alfred Wolfsohn Voice Research Centre in a large house in Golders Green, offering an approach to singing lessons and voice training based solely upon his self-devised techniques.The aim of his lessons was to help students extend the range and expressiveness of their voice to include every possible vocal sound, which he believed both represented and precipitated the realization of increased human potential in other areas of life. Wolfsohn subscribed to the views of Carl Jung, who proposed that each human psyche comprises a composite of subpersonalities that appear most vividly in dreams. Wolfsohn sought to enable the expression of these subpersonalities through distinct vocal sounds. A number of notable authors, theatre directors, philosophers, and scientists took lessons with Wolfsohn, or observed demonstrations by his students, subsequently acknowledging his contribution to their work, including Peter Brook, Jerzy Grotowski, R. D. Laing, Irene Worth, Jean-Louis Barrault, Aldous Huxley, and Julian Huxley. When Wolfsohn died in 1962, the group of long-standing students divided. One group continued to train their voices under the leadership of Roy Hart, a South African actor and regular attendant of the Alfred Wolfsohn Voice Research Centre since 1947, who extended the vocal demonstrations for invited audiences, instigated by Wolfsohn, into full public performances, including Eight Songs for a Mad King, composed especially for Hart by Peter Maxwell Davies. This group left the Alfred Wolfsohn Voice Research Centre in Golders Green in 1969, migrated to new premises in Hampstead, and formed a performing arts troupe, assuming the name the Roy Hart Theatre, which included some who like Hart had studied with Alfred Wolfsohn, and others who had never met the German teacher, but had been students in Hart's drama classes, which the South African actor began teaching at venues across London during the late 1950s. In 1974 the Roy Hart Theatre moved to the South of France to establish a permanent rehearsal studio, school, and drama troupe. Roy Hart died in a car accident a year later, but the French-based group of remaining members continued producing experimental theatre and music productions and teaching the approach to vocal expression initially established by Wolfsohn. The other group, including vocalist Jenny Johnson and film maker, author, and archivist Leslie Shepard, dispersed and sought to continue the work of the Alfred Wolfsohn Voice Research Centre. Alfred Wolfsohn was instrumental in precipitating and inspiring many types of extended vocal technique used by performing artists who incorporate into their performances sounds not usually used in speech or song. In addition, Wolfsohn was a major influence on the therapeutic and creative work of Paul Newham, Wolfsohn's official biographer who together with Leslie Shepard re-established the London base for the Alfred Wolfsohn Voice Research Centre in 1990. (en)
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  • 1896-09-23 (xsd:date)
  • 1896-9-23
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  • 1896-01-01 (xsd:date)
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  • 1962-02-05 (xsd:date)
  • 1962-2-5
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  • 1962-01-01 (xsd:date)
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  • Alfred Wolfsohn
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  • German musician (en)
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  • Alfred Wolfsohn (né le 23 septembre 1896 - mort le 5 février 1962) était un professeur de chant allemand. Il eut pour élève Paula Lindberg, la belle-mère de Charlotte Salomon, et figure dans les peintures de cette dernière sous le nom d'Amadeus Daberlohn. Il est le fondateur d'une méthode de développement de la voix connue aujourd'hui sous le nom d'approche Roy Hart Theatre. (fr)
  • Alfred Wolfsohn (23 September 1896 – 5 February 1962) was a German singing teacher who suffered persistent auditory hallucination of screaming soldiers, whom he had witnessed dying of wounds while serving as a stretcher bearer in the trenches of World War I. After being subsequently diagnosed with Shell Shock, Wolfsohn failed to recover in response to hospitalization or psychiatric treatment, but cured himself by vocalizing extreme sounds, bringing about what he described as a combination of catharsis and exorcism. When Wolfsohn died in 1962, the group of long-standing students divided. (en)
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  • Alfred Wolfsohn (fr)
  • Alfred Wolfsohn (en)
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  • Alfred Wolfsohn (en)
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