Alan N. Shapiro (born 23 April 1956 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American science fiction and media theorist. He is a lecturer and essayist in the fields of science fiction studies, media theory, French philosophy, technological art, sociology of culture, social choreography, software theory, humanities informatics, Computer Science 2.0, robotics, rethinking science, and futuristic design. Shapiro's book and other published writings on Star Trek have contributed to a change in public perception about the importance of Star Trek for contemporary culture. His published essays on Jean Baudrillard - especially in the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies - have contributed to a change in public perception about the importance of Baudrillard's work for culture, philosophy, and sociology.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Alan N. Shapiro (born 23 April 1956 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American science fiction and media theorist. He is a lecturer and essayist in the fields of science fiction studies, media theory, French philosophy, technological art, sociology of culture, social choreography, software theory, humanities informatics, Computer Science 2.0, robotics, rethinking science, and futuristic design. Shapiro's book and other published writings on Star Trek have contributed to a change in public perception about the importance of Star Trek for contemporary culture. His published essays on Jean Baudrillard - especially in the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies - have contributed to a change in public perception about the importance of Baudrillard's work for culture, philosophy, and sociology. Shapiro has co-developed many of the core ideas of the emerging field of social choreography, contributing many essays to the field's most important journal, Choreograph.net. He is a founding member of the Institute for Social Choreography in Frankfurt. He has also contributed many essays to the journal of technology and society NoemaLab — on technological art, software theory, Computer Science 2.0, futuristic design, and the political philosophy of the information society,. In 2010-2011, Shapiro lectured on "The Car of the Future" at Transmediale in Berlin, Germany, and on robots and androids at Ars Electronica and at the Interface Culture lab of the Arts University in Linz, Austria. In September 2011, Shapiro gave a major speech at the Plektrum Festival in Tallinn, Estonia on "The Meaning of Life." In November 2011, Shapiro was the keynote speaker at the conference on "Knowledge of the Future" at the University of Vienna. In January 2012, Shapiro was a keynote speaker at the BOBCATSSS conference on Information Management of the organization of European university libraries. In January 2012, Shapiro gave a lecture on media theory in the Speakers' Series of the Centre for the Study of Theory, Culture and Politics at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario, Canada.In March 2012, Shapiro gave two lectures on futuristic design at the Sandberg Institute of Arts and Design in Amsterdam. In June 2012, Shapiro was a keynote speaker at the IEEE Conference on the Information Society in London. In July 2012, Shapiro gave the International Flusser Lecture at the Vilém Flusser Archive, Institute for Time-Based Media, University of the Arts, Berlin. In January–February 2013, Shapiro spoke on "Art and Design in the Age of New Media and New Technologies" at the Bath Spa University School of Art and Design, and on "The Future of Software" at Transmediale. In March 2013, Shapiro was a keynote speaker at the ISI International Symposium of Information Science, University of Applied Sciences in Potsdam. Shapiro is a visiting professor in the Department of Film and New Media at the NABA (Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti) University of Arts and Design in Milan. He is also a lecturer at the Goethe University in Frankfurt and at the Art and Design University in Offenbach. Shapiro is the editor and translator of The Technological Herbarium by Gianna Maria Gatti, a groundbreaking book about technological art. He has three contributions to the innovative book on social choreography Framemakers: Choreography as an Aesthetics of Change edited by Jeffrey Gormly. His book Software of the Future: The Model Precedes the Real will be published in German by the Walther König Press in 2013. Shapiro is also a software developer, with nearly 20 years industry experience in C++ and Java development. He has worked on several projects for Volkswagen, Deutsche Bahn (DB Systel), and media and telecommunications companies. Shapiro's entrepreneurial goal is to found a company that will be active in humanities informatics and Computer Science 2.0. Existing informatics tends to automate everything, and it is based only on the rational-calculating left brain (see Marshall McLuhan, The Global Village). A different informatics that incorporates the creativity and human knowledge of the entire brainis possible, Shapiro describes in Re-Thinking Science conducted by Ulrike Reinhard. Key texts published so far towards the invention of Computer Science 2.0 are: "Design for a Working Quantum Computer in Software", "The Paradigm of Object Spaces: Better Software is Coming" (co-author: Bernhard Angerer)., and "A Proposal for Developing Quantum Computing in Software" (co-author: Alexis Clancy). Shapiro was accepted at age 15 as an undergraduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He studied at MIT for 2 years. He received his B.A. from Cornell University, where he studied government and European Intellectual History. He has an M.A. in sociology from New York University (NYU). In a 10-page review-essay of his book Star Trek: Technologies of Disappearance, the journal Science Fiction Studies called his book one of the most original works in the field of science fiction theory. See also the extensive discussions of Star Trek: Technologies of Disappearance in Csicsery-Ronay's major reference work on science fiction studies, in The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction and in The Yearbook of English Studies. Shapiro has lived most of his life in the United States, but also 24 years in Europe (20 of them in Germany). (en)
dbo:almaMater
dbo:birthDate
  • 1956-04-23 (xsd:date)
  • 1956-4-23
dbo:birthPlace
dbo:field
dbo:influencedBy
dbo:knownFor
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 29651657 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 740664004 (xsd:integer)
dbp:imageSize
  • 125 (xsd:integer)
dbp:nationality
  • United States
dct:description
  • American science fiction and media theorist (en)
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Alan N. Shapiro (born 23 April 1956 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American science fiction and media theorist. He is a lecturer and essayist in the fields of science fiction studies, media theory, French philosophy, technological art, sociology of culture, social choreography, software theory, humanities informatics, Computer Science 2.0, robotics, rethinking science, and futuristic design. Shapiro's book and other published writings on Star Trek have contributed to a change in public perception about the importance of Star Trek for contemporary culture. His published essays on Jean Baudrillard - especially in the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies - have contributed to a change in public perception about the importance of Baudrillard's work for culture, philosophy, and sociology. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Alan N. Shapiro (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:gender
  • male (en)
foaf:givenName
  • Alan (en)
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Alan N. Shapiro (en)
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is foaf:primaryTopic of