Abbie Gifford Rogers (January 20, 1841 – May 21, 1894), was the first wife of Henry Huttleston Rogers, (1840–1909), a United States capitalist, businesswoman and industrialist. As children, Abbie and "Hen", each of Mayflower lineage, grew up and went to school together in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, a small coastal fishing town with a whaling heritage. They were married in 1862, and started their family life together in a one-room shack in the newly discovered western Pennsylvania oil fields. Although he and Abbie lived frugally for many years, by 1875, Henry Rogers had risen in the petroleum industry to become one of the key men in John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Trust. He invested heavily in various industries, including copper, steel, mining, and railways. The Virginian Railway is wide

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  • Abbie Gifford Rogers (January 20, 1841 – May 21, 1894), was the first wife of Henry Huttleston Rogers, (1840–1909), a United States capitalist, businesswoman and industrialist. As children, Abbie and "Hen", each of Mayflower lineage, grew up and went to school together in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, a small coastal fishing town with a whaling heritage. They were married in 1862, and started their family life together in a one-room shack in the newly discovered western Pennsylvania oil fields. Although he and Abbie lived frugally for many years, by 1875, Henry Rogers had risen in the petroleum industry to become one of the key men in John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Trust. He invested heavily in various industries, including copper, steel, mining, and railways. The Virginian Railway is widely considered his final life's achievement. Rogers amassed a great fortune, estimated at over $100 million, and became one of the wealthiest men in the United States. Abbie and Henry Rogers were generous, providing many public works for their hometown of Fairhaven, including the Town Hall which Abbie donated in 1894 shortly before her death. Rogers also financially assisted such notables as Mark Twain, Helen Keller, and Booker T. Washington. Abbie and Henry Rogers had 5 children, four of whom survived to adulthood. She died suddenly on May 21, 1894, following an operation in New York City. After her death, Henry Rogers is said to have immersed himself even more in his work during the 15 years he outlived her. When he died in 1909, he was interred with her at Riverside Cemetery in Fairhaven. (en)
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  • 1841-01-20 (xsd:date)
  • 1841-1-20
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  • Abbie Gifford Rogers (en)
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  • 1841-01-01 (xsd:date)
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  • 1894-05-21 (xsd:date)
  • 1894-5-21
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  • American philanthropist (en)
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
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  • Abbie Gifford Rogers (January 20, 1841 – May 21, 1894), was the first wife of Henry Huttleston Rogers, (1840–1909), a United States capitalist, businesswoman and industrialist. As children, Abbie and "Hen", each of Mayflower lineage, grew up and went to school together in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, a small coastal fishing town with a whaling heritage. They were married in 1862, and started their family life together in a one-room shack in the newly discovered western Pennsylvania oil fields. Although he and Abbie lived frugally for many years, by 1875, Henry Rogers had risen in the petroleum industry to become one of the key men in John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Trust. He invested heavily in various industries, including copper, steel, mining, and railways. The Virginian Railway is wide (en)
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  • Abbie G. Rogers (en)
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