On 10 April and 13–19 May 2010, the Thai military cracked down on the National United Front of Democracy Against Dictatorship (UDD) protests in central Bangkok, the capital of Thailand. The crackdown was the culmination of months of protests that called for the Democrat Party-led government of Abhisit Vejjajiva to dissolve parliament and hold elections. The crackdowns occurred in the vicinity of protest sites near Phan Fah bridge and Ratchaprasong intersection. More than 85 were killed, including more than 80 civilians according to the Erawan EMS Center. Two foreigners and two paramedics were killed. More than 2,000 were injured, an undisclosed number of arrests occurred, and 51 protesters remained missing as of 8 June. The Thai media dubbed the crackdowns "Cruel April" (Thai: เมษาโหด Mesa

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dbo:abstract
  • On 10 April and 13–19 May 2010, the Thai military cracked down on the National United Front of Democracy Against Dictatorship (UDD) protests in central Bangkok, the capital of Thailand. The crackdown was the culmination of months of protests that called for the Democrat Party-led government of Abhisit Vejjajiva to dissolve parliament and hold elections. The crackdowns occurred in the vicinity of protest sites near Phan Fah bridge and Ratchaprasong intersection. More than 85 were killed, including more than 80 civilians according to the Erawan EMS Center. Two foreigners and two paramedics were killed. More than 2,000 were injured, an undisclosed number of arrests occurred, and 51 protesters remained missing as of 8 June. The Thai media dubbed the crackdowns "Cruel April" (Thai: เมษาโหด Mesa Hot) and "Savage May" (Thai: พฤษภาอำมหิต Phruetsapha Ammahit). After the protest leaders surrendered at the conclusion of the 19 May crackdown, dozens of arson attacks occurred nationwide, including at CentralWorld. On 10 April, troops executed an unsuccessful crackdown on protesters at Phan Fah bridge on Ratchadamnoen Road, resulting in 25 deaths (including one Japanese journalist and 5 uniformed soldiers) and over 800 injuries. Troops fired on protesters near Makhawan Rangsan bridge during the afternoon. Later that evening, automatic gunfire, explosives, and tear gas were used in clashes on Khao San Road and Khok Wua intersection. The Erawan Center noted that among the dead protesters were soldiers in disguise. The military claimed that soldiers only used live rounds to defend themselves, and claimed that the military deaths were due to terrorists. Ratchaprasong was surrounded with armoured vehicles and snipers in the days leading to 13 May. On the evening of 13 May, Khattiya Sawasdiphol ("Seh Daeng"), a popular security adviser to the protesters, was shot in the head by what was apparently a sniper's bullet while he was giving an interview to The New York Times. The state of emergency, already in place in Bangkok, was expanded to 17 provinces and the military commended an extended crackdown, leading to an additional 41 civilians deaths (including an Italian photographer) and more than 250 injuries by 8:30 pm on 18 May. One military death occurred due to accidental friendly fire. The military claimed that all civilians killed were either armed terrorists or civilians shot by terrorists, and noted that some civilians were shot by terrorists disguised in Army uniforms. The military declared the area a "live fire zone," and medics were banned from entering. On 16 May, UDD leaders said they were ready for talks as long as the military pulled back, but the government demanded the protesters' unconditional dispersal. The government rejected a Senate call for a ceasefire and Senate-mediated negotiations. On 17 May, Amnesty International called for the military to stop using live ammunition. Armored vehicles led the final assault into Ratchaprasong in the early morning of 19 May, killing at least five. Soldiers were reported to have fired on medical staff who went to the aid of the shooting victims. By 1:30 pm, UDD leaders surrendered to police and told protesters to give themselves up. Dozens of arson attacks soon broke out nationwide. A curfew was declared and troops were authorized to shoot on sight anybody inciting unrest. (en)
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  • 27408756 (xsd:integer)
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  • 744323075 (xsd:integer)
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  • A makeshift shrine on the spot where a protester was shot
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  • A makeshift shrine on the spot where a protester was shot
dbp:date
  • December 2012
  • April to May 2010
dbp:fatalities
  • --06-08
dbp:injuries
  • at least 2,100
dbp:location
dbp:perps
  • Royal Thai Army and associated Royal Thai Government security forces
dbp:reason
  • Article needs to be updated to mention subsequent investigations by the Truth Commission and the DSI.
dbp:title
  • 2010 (xsd:integer)
dbp:type
  • section
  • Extended large-scale military crackdown
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  • On 10 April and 13–19 May 2010, the Thai military cracked down on the National United Front of Democracy Against Dictatorship (UDD) protests in central Bangkok, the capital of Thailand. The crackdown was the culmination of months of protests that called for the Democrat Party-led government of Abhisit Vejjajiva to dissolve parliament and hold elections. The crackdowns occurred in the vicinity of protest sites near Phan Fah bridge and Ratchaprasong intersection. More than 85 were killed, including more than 80 civilians according to the Erawan EMS Center. Two foreigners and two paramedics were killed. More than 2,000 were injured, an undisclosed number of arrests occurred, and 51 protesters remained missing as of 8 June. The Thai media dubbed the crackdowns "Cruel April" (Thai: เมษาโหด Mesa (en)
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  • 2010 Thai military crackdown (en)
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