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The Elements of Eloquence: How to Turn the Perfect English Phrase is a non-fiction book by Mark Forsyth first published in 2013. The book explains selected figures of classical rhetoric, with each chapter dedicated to a particular rhetorical figure and including famous examples of its use from literature, particularly the works of William Shakespeare. Forsyth argues that Shakespeare's genius for language did not appear out of thin air, but was the result of the careful study and practice of formal rhetorical figures of speech. As well as providing many examples from varied literary and non-literary sources, he particularly highlights the occurrence of different figures throughout Shakespeare's development as a writer.

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  • The Elements of Eloquence
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  • The Elements of Eloquence: How to Turn the Perfect English Phrase is a non-fiction book by Mark Forsyth first published in 2013. The book explains selected figures of classical rhetoric, with each chapter dedicated to a particular rhetorical figure and including famous examples of its use from literature, particularly the works of William Shakespeare. Forsyth argues that Shakespeare's genius for language did not appear out of thin air, but was the result of the careful study and practice of formal rhetorical figures of speech. As well as providing many examples from varied literary and non-literary sources, he particularly highlights the occurrence of different figures throughout Shakespeare's development as a writer.
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  • The Elements of Eloquence: How to Turn the Perfect English Phrase
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  • The Elements of Eloquence: How to Turn the Perfect English Phrase is a non-fiction book by Mark Forsyth first published in 2013. The book explains selected figures of classical rhetoric, with each chapter dedicated to a particular rhetorical figure and including famous examples of its use from literature, particularly the works of William Shakespeare. Forsyth argues that Shakespeare's genius for language did not appear out of thin air, but was the result of the careful study and practice of formal rhetorical figures of speech. As well as providing many examples from varied literary and non-literary sources, he particularly highlights the occurrence of different figures throughout Shakespeare's development as a writer.
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  • 9781848316218
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  • UK
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  • Whereat, with blade, with bloody blameful blade, He bravely broached his boiling bloody breast;
  • Grace me no grace, nor uncle me no uncle: I am no traitor's uncle; and that word 'grace' In an ungracious mouth is but profane.
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