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Skip to My Lou is a popular children's song. Skip to My (The) Lou was a popular American partner-stealing dance from the 1840s.It was also a popular lyrical game in Abraham Lincoln's youth in southern Indiana and Kentucky (1826) with verses such as "Hurry up slow poke, do oh do", "I'll get her back in spite of you", "Gone again, what shall I do", and "I'll get another girl sweeter than you". The "lou" in the title comes from the word "loo", a Scottish word for "love".

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  • Skip To My Lou
  • Skip to My Lou
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  • "Skip to My Lou" ("Saltando hacia mi amor") es una canción popular americana y un baile de intercambio de parejas durante el período del Viejo Oeste.
  • Skip to My Lou is a popular children's song. Skip to My (The) Lou was a popular American partner-stealing dance from the 1840s.It was also a popular lyrical game in Abraham Lincoln's youth in southern Indiana and Kentucky (1826) with verses such as "Hurry up slow poke, do oh do", "I'll get her back in spite of you", "Gone again, what shall I do", and "I'll get another girl sweeter than you". The "lou" in the title comes from the word "loo", a Scottish word for "love".
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  • "Skip to My Lou" ("Saltando hacia mi amor") es una canción popular americana y un baile de intercambio de parejas durante el período del Viejo Oeste.
  • Skip to My Lou is a popular children's song. Skip to My (The) Lou was a popular American partner-stealing dance from the 1840s.It was also a popular lyrical game in Abraham Lincoln's youth in southern Indiana and Kentucky (1826) with verses such as "Hurry up slow poke, do oh do", "I'll get her back in spite of you", "Gone again, what shall I do", and "I'll get another girl sweeter than you". In early America, some Puritans regarded the fiddle as a tool of the devil (since it led to dancing, which was regarded as sinful). Faced with such a religious obstacle to socializing, young people developed the “play-party,” in which the objectionable features of dancing were removed or masked. The dancers sang and the audience clapped to create rhythm for their own music. The play-party became a popular pastime for teenagers and young married couples. As people moved westward square dancing and barn dancing became acceptable, at least to some. "Skip to My Lou" is a simple game of stealing partners (or swapping partners as in square dancing). It begins with any number of couples skipping hand in hand around in a ring. A lone boy in the center of the moving circle of couples sings, "Lost my partner, what'll I do?" as the girls whirl past him. The young man in the center hesitates while he decides which girl to choose, singing, “I'll get another one just like you.” When he grasps the hand of his chosen one, the latter's partner moves to the center of the ring the game. It is an ice-breaker, providing an opportunity for the participants to get acquainted with one another and to get into a good mood. The "lou" in the title comes from the word "loo", a Scottish word for "love".
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