About: Natura naturans     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : yago:WikicatPhilosophicalConcepts, within Data Space : dbpedia.org associated with source document(s)

Natura naturans is a Latin tag coined during the Middle Ages, meaning "Nature naturing", or more loosely, "nature doing what nature does". The Latin, naturans, is the present active participle of naturo, indicated by the suffix "-ans" which is akin to the English suffix "-ing." naturata, is the perfect passive participle. These terms are most commonly associated with the philosophy of Baruch Spinoza. For Spinoza, natura naturans refers to the self-causing activity of nature, while natura naturata, meaning "nature natured", refers to nature considered as a passive product of an infinite causal chain. Samuel Taylor Coleridge defined it as "Nature in the active sense" as opposed to natura naturata.

AttributesValues
rdf:type
rdfs:label
  • Natura naturans
  • Natura naturans
rdfs:comment
  • Natura naturans is a Latin tag coined during the Middle Ages, meaning "Nature naturing", or more loosely, "nature doing what nature does". The Latin, naturans, is the present active participle of naturo, indicated by the suffix "-ans" which is akin to the English suffix "-ing." naturata, is the perfect passive participle. These terms are most commonly associated with the philosophy of Baruch Spinoza. For Spinoza, natura naturans refers to the self-causing activity of nature, while natura naturata, meaning "nature natured", refers to nature considered as a passive product of an infinite causal chain. Samuel Taylor Coleridge defined it as "Nature in the active sense" as opposed to natura naturata.
  • Natura naturans è un'espressione latina, traducibile con natura naturante, che trova la sua prima concezione nella scolastica e successivamente nel filosofo Giordano Bruno nell'opera De la causa, principio et uno del 1584. Ritroviamo questa concezione nel pensiero del filosofo olandese Baruch Spinoza.Il verbo "naturare", un neologismo latino, vuole rendere l'azione tipica della natura, ovvero il produrre della natura la sua stessa realtà.
sameAs
dct:subject
Wikipage page ID
Wikipage revision ID
Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage
Link from a Wikipage to an external page
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
prov:wasDerivedFrom
has abstract
  • Natura naturans è un'espressione latina, traducibile con natura naturante, che trova la sua prima concezione nella scolastica e successivamente nel filosofo Giordano Bruno nell'opera De la causa, principio et uno del 1584. Ritroviamo questa concezione nel pensiero del filosofo olandese Baruch Spinoza.Il verbo "naturare", un neologismo latino, vuole rendere l'azione tipica della natura, ovvero il produrre della natura la sua stessa realtà. L'espressione è conosciuta soprattutto perché assume in contrapposizione alla natura naturata, un valore fondante nel pensiero del grande filosofo seicentesco Baruch Spinoza. La natura naturante è in tale concezione l'intervento immanente, come perpetua attività generatrice, di Dio, che rende la natura perfetta accompagnandone costantemente il divenire secondo le leggi della sua propria necessità razionale.Secondo la concezione panteistica di Spinoza, infatti, Dio è la natura e la natura è divina: questa identificazione può però essere intesa in due sensi diversi, dal punto di vista dinamico (la natura naturante, nel divenire della sua perfezione), e statico (natura naturata, ovvero la perfezione come risultato compiuto).
  • Natura naturans is a Latin tag coined during the Middle Ages, meaning "Nature naturing", or more loosely, "nature doing what nature does". The Latin, naturans, is the present active participle of naturo, indicated by the suffix "-ans" which is akin to the English suffix "-ing." naturata, is the perfect passive participle. These terms are most commonly associated with the philosophy of Baruch Spinoza. For Spinoza, natura naturans refers to the self-causing activity of nature, while natura naturata, meaning "nature natured", refers to nature considered as a passive product of an infinite causal chain. Samuel Taylor Coleridge defined it as "Nature in the active sense" as opposed to natura naturata. The distinction is expressed in Spinoza's Ethics as follows: [B]y Natura naturans we must understand what is in itself and is conceived through itself, or such attributes of substance as express an eternal and infinite essence, that is … God, insofar as he is considered as a free cause. But by Natura naturata I understand whatever follows from the necessity of God's nature, or from God's attributes, that is, all the modes of God's attributes insofar as they are considered as things which are in God, and can neither be nor be conceived without God. To Spinoza, Nature and God were the same (see Deus sive Natura).
http://purl.org/voc/vrank#hasRank
http://purl.org/li...ics/gold/hypernym
is Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage of
is foaf:primaryTopic of
is notableIdea of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 09 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: PivotViewer | iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 07.20.3235 as of Jun 25 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2020 OpenLink Software