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Mongolian shamanism, more broadly called the Mongolian folk religion, or occasionally Tengerism, refers to the animistic and shamanic ethnic religion that has been practiced in Mongolia and its surrounding areas (including Buryatia and Inner Mongolia) at least since the age of recorded history. The Mongolian endonym is Böö mörgöl (Бөө мөргөл). In the earliest known stages it was intricately tied to all other aspects of social life and to the tribal organization of Mongolian society. Along the way, it has become influenced by and mingled with Buddhism. During the socialist years of the twentieth century it was heavily repressed and has since made a comeback.

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  • Mongolian shamanism
  • Chamanisme mongol
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  • Le chamanisme mongol, plus généralement appelé religion populaire mongole ou occasionnellement tengrisme. En mongol, on parle de böö mörgöl (mongol cyrillique : бөө мөргөл), parfois traduit par paganisme.
  • Mongolian shamanism, more broadly called the Mongolian folk religion, or occasionally Tengerism, refers to the animistic and shamanic ethnic religion that has been practiced in Mongolia and its surrounding areas (including Buryatia and Inner Mongolia) at least since the age of recorded history. The Mongolian endonym is Böö mörgöl (Бөө мөргөл). In the earliest known stages it was intricately tied to all other aspects of social life and to the tribal organization of Mongolian society. Along the way, it has become influenced by and mingled with Buddhism. During the socialist years of the twentieth century it was heavily repressed and has since made a comeback.
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  • Le chamanisme mongol, plus généralement appelé religion populaire mongole ou occasionnellement tengrisme. En mongol, on parle de böö mörgöl (mongol cyrillique : бөө мөргөл), parfois traduit par paganisme. Le chamanisme jaune est un terme utilisé pour désigner une version particulière du chamanisme mongol, influencé par le bouddhisme. Le terme « Jaune » se réfère au bouddhisme majoritaire de Mongolie suivant l'école des bonnets jaunes (Gelugpa) du bouddhisme tibétain, dans laquelle les membres portent des bonnets jaunes pendant le les services. Le terme sert également à le distinguer d'un chamanisme qui n'est pas influencé par le bouddhisme (d'après ses pratiquants), le chamanisme noir, ainsi que du chamanisme blanc.
  • Mongolian shamanism, more broadly called the Mongolian folk religion, or occasionally Tengerism, refers to the animistic and shamanic ethnic religion that has been practiced in Mongolia and its surrounding areas (including Buryatia and Inner Mongolia) at least since the age of recorded history. The Mongolian endonym is Böö mörgöl (Бөө мөргөл). In the earliest known stages it was intricately tied to all other aspects of social life and to the tribal organization of Mongolian society. Along the way, it has become influenced by and mingled with Buddhism. During the socialist years of the twentieth century it was heavily repressed and has since made a comeback. Yellow shamanism is the term used to designate the particular version of Mongolian shamanism which adopts the expressive style of Buddhism. "Yellow" indicates Buddhism in Mongolia, since most Buddhists there belong to what is called the Gelug or "Yellow sect" of Tibetan Buddhism, whose members wear yellow hats during services. The term also serves to distinguish it from a form of shamanism not influenced by Buddhism (according to its adherents), called black shamanism. Mongolian shamanism is centered on the worship of the tngri (gods) and the highest Tenger (Heaven, God of Heaven, God) or Qormusta Tengri. In the Mongolian folk religion, Genghis Khan is considered one of the embodiments, if not the main embodiment, of the Tenger. The Mausoleum of Genghis Khan in Ordos City, in Inner Mongolia, is an important center of this worship tradition.
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