About: Dicker-rod     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : owl:Thing, within Data Space : dbpedia.org associated with source document(s)

The dicker-rod (also spelled dickerod) was used in the defunct World Football League in 1974 for the purpose of replacing the first down chains more commonly used in gridiron football organizations. The device was invented and patented by George Dicker of Orange County, California. The dicker-rod was intended for convenience. A full chain crew was not needed, and measurements could be conducted by one person instead of the typical three. However, it never caught on, and the three-man chain crew remains the standard.

AttributesValues
rdfs:label
  • Dicker-rod
rdfs:comment
  • The dicker-rod (also spelled dickerod) was used in the defunct World Football League in 1974 for the purpose of replacing the first down chains more commonly used in gridiron football organizations. The device was invented and patented by George Dicker of Orange County, California. The dicker-rod was intended for convenience. A full chain crew was not needed, and measurements could be conducted by one person instead of the typical three. However, it never caught on, and the three-man chain crew remains the standard.
sameAs
dct:subject
Wikipage page ID
Wikipage revision ID
Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
prov:wasDerivedFrom
has abstract
  • The dicker-rod (also spelled dickerod) was used in the defunct World Football League in 1974 for the purpose of replacing the first down chains more commonly used in gridiron football organizations. The device was invented and patented by George Dicker of Orange County, California. The device was two and a half yards (90 inches) long. If a ball was placed on the 23-yard line, a marker would be placed 2 yards up the rod at the 25-yard line. Then, in order to measure whether a first down was attained, the dicker rod would be laid down at the 35-yard line, and the spot of the ball would be measured against the marker on the rod, which would now be at the 33-yard line, 2 yards away from the 35-yard line. The dicker-rod was intended for convenience. A full chain crew was not needed, and measurements could be conducted by one person instead of the typical three. However, it never caught on, and the three-man chain crew remains the standard.
http://purl.org/voc/vrank#hasRank
is Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage of
is Wikipage redirect of
is Wikipage disambiguates of
is foaf:primaryTopic of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git39 as of Aug 09 2019


Alternative Linked Data Documents: PivotViewer | iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 07.20.3235 as of Jun 25 2020, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2020 OpenLink Software